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Occupational Profile

Electronics Assemblers and Fabricators

Electronics assemblers and fabricators mount, secure, interconnect and adjust parts and components to assemble and fabricate electronic equipment.

  • Avg. Salary $38,252.00
  • Avg. Wage $18.58
  • Minimum Education Varies
  • Outlook N/A
Also Known As

Circuit Board Assembler, Assembly Line Worker, Production Worker

NOC & Interest Codes
The Electronics Assemblers and Fabricators is part of the following larger National Occupational Classification (NOC).
Electronics Assemblers
NOC code: 9483.1
OBJECTIVE

Interest in precision working to assemble microcircuits requiring fine hand assembly, and to use microscopes and adhere to clean-room procedures; and to operate automatic and semi-automatic machines to position, solder and clean components on printed circuit boards

METHODICAL

Interest in copying information to solder and assemble manually, various electronic components such as resistors, diodes, transistors, capacitors, integrated circuits, switches, wires and other electronic parts onto printed circuit boards; may repair and overhaul older devices

innovative

Interest in verifying dimensions and alignment of parts; may replace defective components

Reading Interest Codes
A Quick Guide

The interest code helps you figure out if you’d like to work in a particular occupation. It’s based on the Canadian Work Preference Inventory (CWPI), which measures 5 occupational interests: Directive, Innovative, Methodical, Objective and Social.

Each set of 3 interest codes is listed in order of importance.

A code in capital letters means it’s a strong fit for the occupation. 

A code in all lowercase letters means the fit is weaker.

Learn More

Duties
Updated Mar 11, 2016

Electronics assemblers and fabricators perform tasks required in manufacturing electronic products such as computer circuit boards, medical equipment, transmitters, receivers, automotive equipment and measuring devices. These tasks generally require working to very precise specifications.

Electronics assemblers put together electronic components, sub-assemblies, products or systems. They may:

  • solder and manually place components such as resistors, diodes, transistors, capacitors, integrated circuits, wires and other electronic parts to designated locations on printed circuit boards
  • assemble microcircuits requiring fine hand assembly
  • install, mount, fasten, align and adjust parts, components, wiring and harnesses to subassemblies and assemblies using hand and small power tools
  • operate automatic and semi-automatic machines to position, solder and clean components on printed circuit boards
  • assemble mechanical parts into large enclosures, frames or shelves.

Electronics fabricators set up, operate or monitor process equipment such as automatic or semi-automatic machines that fabricate, solder, clean, seal and stamp electronic components.

Working Conditions
Updated Mar 11, 2016

Most electronics assemblers and fabricators work in assembly plants. Shift work may be required.

Where electronics assemblers also do mechanical assembly, some heavy lifting is required.

  • Strength Required Lift up to 5 kg
Skills & Abilities
Updated Mar 11, 2016

Electronics assemblers and fabricators need the ability to:

  • perform routine tasks with care and precision
  • handle repetitive tasks
  • handle small parts and tools
  • work at a steady, rapid pace
  • distinguish colours used to identify wires and components
  • learn new tasks reasonably quickly
  • get along well with fellow employees in assembly plants.

They should enjoy operating equipment and performing tasks requiring precision, and having clear rules and organized methods for their work.

Educational Requirements
Updated Mar 11, 2016

There are no standard education requirements in this occupation. However, employers may prefer to hire high school graduates. A basic knowledge of electronics and experience with soldering and component identification are definite assets.

Courses in basic electronics are offered by high schools, private vocational schools, school board Continuing Education departments, technical institutes and colleges. Many courses are offered evenings and weekends. Course dates, times and locations are advertised in local newspapers.

Electronics assemblers and fabricators are trained on the job. Training periods range from one week to six months depending on the complexity of the work and the worker's interest in learning more complicated tasks.

For a broad list of programs and courses that may be related to this occupation try searching using keywords.

Employment & Advancement
Updated Mar 11, 2016

Electronics assemblers and fabricators are employed by electronics manufacturers. Plants usually are located in or near major urban centres where there is ready access to parts, courier services and customers. Employees often are hired on a temporary basis to cover peak production periods and may be laid off when production requirements decrease. Some assemblers and fabricators are self-employed and work on a piece work basis.

Experienced electronics assemblers and fabricators may advance to electronics inspector and electronics tester positions. Electronics inspectors check electronic components and assemblies for production faults and keep records of inspection results. Electronics testers:

  • use testing equipment to locate circuit and wiring faults and component defects
  • repair assemblies
  • compare test results to specifications
  • prepare reports.

Promotion to electronics tester positions may require some post-secondary education related to basic electronic theory, testing techniques and testing equipment. Without further education, advancement opportunities beyond electronics testing and assembly line supervisory positions are limited.

Electronics assemblers and fabricators are part of the larger 2011 National Occupational Classification 9483: Electronics Assemblers, Fabricators, Inspectors and Testers. In Alberta, 80% of people employed in this classification work in the following industries:

The employment outlook in this occupation will be influenced by a wide variety of factors including:

  • trends and events affecting overall employment (especially in the industries listed above)
  • location in Alberta
  • employment turnover (work opportunities generated by people leaving existing positions)
  • occupational growth (work opportunities resulting from the creation of new positions that never existed before)
  • size of the occupation.

Employment turnover is expected to increase as members of the baby boom generation retire over the next few years.

Wage & Salary
Updated Mar 11, 2016

Wages vary depending on the level of skill required and the method of payment. Some assemblers are paid an hourly rate; others work on a piece work basis.

Electronics assemblers and fabricators are part of the larger 2011 National Occupational Classification 9523: Electronics assemblers, fabricators, inspectors and testers. 

According to the 2015 Alberta Wage and Salary Survey, Albertans in the Electronics assemblers, fabricators, inspectors and testers occupational group earned on average from $18.00 to $21.39 an hour. The overall average wage was $18.58 an hour. For more information, see the Electronics assemblers, fabricators, inspectors and testers wage profile.

Related High School Subjects
  • Trades, Manufacturing and Transportation
    • Electro-Technologies
    • Fabrication
Related Post-Secondary Field of Study
  • Trades, Industrial and Related Training

Updated Mar 19, 2014. The information contained in this profile is current as of the dates shown. Salary, employment outlook and educational program information may change without notice. It is advised that you confirm this information before making any career decisions.

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