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Avionics Technician

Avionics technicians inspect, modify, install, maintain, repair and certify electronic equipment used in aviation.

  • Avg. Salary $61,405.00
  • Avg. Wage $29.80
  • Minimum Education 2 years post-secondary
  • Outlook N/A
Also Known As

Aircraft Electronics Technician, Mechanic, Service Technician, Avionics Bench Technician, Avionics Line Technician

NOC Codes

In Canada, the federal government groups and organizes occupations based on a National Occupational Classification (NOC) system. This alis occupation may not reflect the entire NOC group it is part of. Data for the NOC group can apply across multiple occupations.

The NOC system is updated every 5 years to reflect changes in the labour market. Government forms and labour market data may group and refer to an occupation differently, depending on the system used. Here is how this occupation has been classified over time:

  • 2006 NOC: Aircraft Instrument Mechanics and Technicians (2244.1);  Aircraft Electrical Mechanics and Technicians (2244.2);  Avionics Mechanics and Technicians (2244.3) 
  • 2006 NOC-S: Aircraft Instrument, Electrical and Avionics Mechanics, Technicians and Inspectors (C144) 
  • 2011 NOC: Aircraft instrument, electrical and avionics mechanics, technicians and inspectors (2244) 
Interest Codes
The Avionics Technician is part of the following larger National Occupational Classification (NOC).
Aircraft Instrument Mechanics and Technicians
OBJECTIVE

Interest in precision working to adjust components to revised tolerances and to test instruments using electrical and electronic test equipment, micrometers, pressure gauges and vacuum-pump testers

METHODICAL

Interest in testing instruments to ensure that they conform to operating specifications

innovative

Interest in analyzing data from equipment tests to diagnose causes of instrument malfunctions

Reading Interest Codes
A Quick Guide

The interest code helps you figure out if you’d like to work in a particular occupation. 
It’s based on the Canadian Work Preference Inventory (CWPI), which measures 5 occupational interests: Directive, Innovative, Methodical, Objective and Social.

Each set of 3 interest codes is listed in order of importance.

A code in capital letters means it’s a strong fit for the occupation.

A code in all lowercase letters means the fit is weaker.

Learn More

Aircraft Electrical Mechanics and Technicians
OBJECTIVE

Interest in precision working to test, overhaul, repair and modify electrical systems and equipment

METHODICAL

Interest in measuring voltage, current and resistance at specified locations when troubleshooting faults

innovative

Interest in analyzing data from observations of equipment in operation, by examinations of parts and from results of electrical tests, to diagnose faults

Reading Interest Codes
A Quick Guide

The interest code helps you figure out if you’d like to work in a particular occupation. 
It’s based on the Canadian Work Preference Inventory (CWPI), which measures 5 occupational interests: Directive, Innovative, Methodical, Objective and Social.

Each set of 3 interest codes is listed in order of importance.

A code in capital letters means it’s a strong fit for the occupation.

A code in all lowercase letters means the fit is weaker.

Learn More

Avionics Mechanics and Technicians
OBJECTIVE

Interest in precision working to modify, adjust and test avionics systems and equipment

METHODICAL

Interest in ensuring that installation, maintenance, repair and overhaul of avionics systems meet established specifications

innovative

Interest in analyzing data from observations of equipment in operation, by examinations of parts and from results of electronic tests, to troubleshoot faults

Reading Interest Codes
A Quick Guide

The interest code helps you figure out if you’d like to work in a particular occupation. 
It’s based on the Canadian Work Preference Inventory (CWPI), which measures 5 occupational interests: Directive, Innovative, Methodical, Objective and Social.

Each set of 3 interest codes is listed in order of importance.

A code in capital letters means it’s a strong fit for the occupation.

A code in all lowercase letters means the fit is weaker.

Learn More

Duties
Updated Feb 23, 2017

Avionics include electrical, electronic and instrumentation systems on aircraft.

Avionics technicians work closely with other aircraft maintenance personnel. In general, they inspect, install, configure, repair, maintain and certify aircraft avionics components and subsystems. They may use computer-aided drafting and design (CADD) applications and engineering drawing when implementing modifications to avionics and aircraft systems.

The vast majority of work performed by avionics technicians involves:

  • maintaining installed avionics on aircraft
  • installing, troubleshooting, repairing and testing avionics equipment (for example, communications, navigation and flight guidance systems) in aircraft
  • maintaining and testing avionics systems in an approved laboratory environment.

Avionics technicians may be involved in:

  • installing, interfacing, configuring and modifying avionics systems
  • technical writing
  • customer relations
  • fabricating basic sheet metal assemblies
  • entering aircraft technical records including aircraft inspections, journey and technical log books 
  • troubleshooting electrical, electromechanical and electronic instrumentation, circuits and sub-assemblies
  • monitoring and adhering to quality assurance policies and procedures. 

Avionics technicians may work as part of a team with engineers or they may be solely responsible for a particular project, a laboratory or the maintenance of particular avionics systems.

Working Conditions
Updated Feb 23, 2017

Avionics technicians work in laboratories and aircraft hangars, and in confined areas to access avionics components inside an aircraft. They often work outside when there is no hangar to house the aircraft they are working on. They may work shifts and may be required to lift items weighing up to 20 kilograms.

Avionics technicians working on international contracts may be away from home for a few days at a time or for a year or more.

  • Strength Required Lift up to 20 kg
Skills & Abilities
Updated Feb 23, 2017

Avionics technicians need the following characteristics:

  • good oral and written communication skills to effectively convey scientific and technical information
  • the ability to work alone and with team members
  • an interest in keeping up to date by taking additional training as required
  • good mathematical abilities
  • analytical ability, persistence and excellent troubleshooting skills
  • good colour vision for distinguishing component parts
  • manual dexterity for handling tools and small parts.

They should enjoy working with tools and equipment at tasks that require precision, having clear rules and organized methods to guide their activities, and analyzing data to solve problems.

Educational Requirements
Updated Feb 23, 2017

In Alberta, the minimum education requirement for avionics technicians is a related two year diploma from an institute of technology.

For a broad list of programs and courses that may be related to this occupation try searching using keywords.

Certification Requirements
Updated Feb 23, 2017

Certified Technician

Under general supervision, certified technicians undertake the routine application of industry recognized codes, standards, procedures and practices. They use established engineering, geoscience or applied science principles and methods of problem solving. Duties may typically include testing, troubleshooting, inspecting, calibrating, drafting, maintaining, modelling, compiling, estimating, surveying, ensuring quality control, supervising in the field and working in sales.

Legislation

Under Alberta's Engineering and Geoscience Professions Act (PDF) and ASET Regulation (PDF), you must be a registered member of the Association of Science and Engineering Technology Professionals of Alberta (ASET) to use the title Certified Technician (C.Tech.). You do not have to be registered if you do not call yourself a Certified Technician.

What You Need

Registration requires:

  • graduation from an applied science, information technology or engineering technology program
  • at least 2 years of acceptable technical experience
  • 3 professional references
  • submission of a competency report, demonstrating at least 3 C.Tech. competencies
  • successful completion of ASET's Professional Practice Exam
  • demonstration of proficiency in English.

For detailed official information, contact the regulatory organization below.

Working in Alberta

Technicians who are certified by and in good standing with a regulatory organization elsewhere in Canada may be eligible for certification in Alberta if certified technicians in the 2 jurisdictions have similar responsibilities and competencies. For more information, see What if I am already certified in another province or territory? and the Alberta regulatory organization above.

To learn about the certification process for internationally educated technicians, see Mechanical Engineering Technician Certification Process (PDF) on AlbertaCanada.com.

Contact Details

The Association of Science and Engineering Technology Professionals of Alberta (ASET)
1600 - 9888 Jasper Ave.
Edmonton, Alberta  T5J 5C6
Phone: 780-425-0626
Toll-free in Alberta: 1-800-272-5619
Fax: 780-424-5053
Email: asetadmin@aset.ab.ca
Website: www.aset.ab.ca

Employment & Advancement
Updated Feb 23, 2017

To find employment, graduates of avionics programs may be required to move to work locations. Often, that is in sparsely populated northern communities.

Most avionics technicians are employed in general aviation and aerospace industries, and related industries such as accessory and equipment manufacturers. They are employed by:

  • airlines and general aviation companies
  • federal government transportation departments
  • the armed forces
  • ground based communications and navigation organizations
  • maintenance repair and overhaul companies
  • aircraft manufacturers.

Most employers have company training programs to improve technicians' technical and supervisory skills. Additional training also is available from equipment and aircraft manufacturers. While most technicians are employed in their area of specialization, some advance to supervisory or management positions.

Avionics technicians are part of the larger 2011 National Occupational Classification 2244: Aircraft Instrument, Electrical and Avionics Mechanics, Technicians and Inspectors. In Alberta, 87% of people employed in this classification work in the following industries:

The employment outlook in this occupation will be influenced by a wide variety of factors including:

  • trends and events affecting overall employment (especially in the industries listed above)
  • location in Alberta
  • employment turnover (work opportunities generated by people leaving existing positions)
  • occupational growth (work opportunities resulting from the creation of new positions that never existed before)
  • size of the occupation.

Employment turnover is expected to increase as members of the baby boom generation retire over the next few years.

Wage & Salary
Updated Feb 23, 2017

For more information see ASET's annual salary survey.

Avionics technicians are part of the larger 2011 National Occupational Classification 2244: Aircraft instrument, electrical and avionics mechanics, technicians and inspectors.

According to the 2017 Alberta Wage and Salary Survey, Albertans in the Aircraft instrument, electrical and avionics mechanics, technicians and inspectors occupational group earned on average from $22.71 to $38.22 an hour. The overall average was $29.80 an hour. For more information, see the Aircraft instrument, electrical and avionics mechanics, technicians and inspectors wage profile.

Related High School Subjects
  • English Language Arts
  • Mathematics
  • Science
  • Trades, Manufacturing and Transportation
    • Electro-Technologies
    • Mechanics
Related Post-Secondary Field of Study
  • Engineering and Science Technologies
Other Sources of Information
Updated Feb 23, 2017

Aircraft Electronics Association (AEA) website: www.aea.net

Association of Science and Engineering Technology Professionals of Alberta - ASET website: www.aset.ab.ca

Canadian Council for Aviation and Aerospace (CCAA) website: www.avaerocouncil.ca

Careers in Transportation website: www.transpocity.ca

Transport Canada website: www.tc.gc.ca

For more information on career planning, education and jobs call the Alberta Supports Contact Centre toll-free at 1-877-644-9992 or 780-644-9992 in Edmonton, or visit an Alberta Works Centre near you.

Updated Feb 11, 2013. The information contained in this profile is current as of the dates shown. Salary, employment outlook and educational program information may change without notice. It is advised that you confirm this information before making any career decisions.

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