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Occupational Profile
Emerging Occupations

Infection Control Professional

Infection control professionals work in health care settings to ensure adherence to Infection Prevention and Control (IPC) standards and protect patients and health care workers from the spread of infection.

This is an emerging occupation. It may have evolved from an existing occupation or emerged in response to consumer needs or technological advances.

  • Avg. Salary N/A
  • Avg. Wage N/A
  • Minimum Education 4 years post-secondary
  • Outlook N/A
Also Known As

Infection Control Practioner, Infection Prevention and Control Practioner, Infection Prevention and Control Professional, Infection Preventionist

NOC & Interest Codes
The Infection Control Professional is part of the following larger National Occupational Classification (NOC).
Registered Nurses
NOC code: 3152
SOCIAL

Interest combinations are unique to each of the occupations in this National Occupational Classification (NOC) group. Please consult the 2003 NOC Career Handbook for further information.

METHODICAL

Interest combinations are unique to each of the occupations in this National Occupational Classification (NOC) group. Please consult the 2003 NOC Career Handbook for further information.

DIRECTIVE

Interest combinations are unique to each of the occupations in this National Occupational Classification (NOC) group. Please consult the 2003 NOC Career Handbook for further information.

Reading Interest Codes
A Quick Guide

The interest code helps you figure out if you’d like to work in a particular occupation. 
It’s based on the Canadian Work Preference Inventory (CWPI), which measures 5 occupational interests: Directive, Innovative, Methodical, Objective and Social.

Each set of 3 interest codes is listed in order of importance.

A code in capital letters means it’s a strong fit for the occupation.

A code in all lowercase letters means the fit is weaker.

Learn More

Duties
Updated Dec 14, 2016

Infection control professionals take the lead on planning and implementing infection prevention and control measures in health care settings such as hospitals, clinics, mental health facilities and group homes. The infection control professional's goal is to improve patient outcomes and prevent health care acquired infections.

Infection control professionals perform the following duties:

  • participate in the development of IPC policies, procedures, education programs and implementation strategies
  • conduct surveillance of health care acquired infections
  • act as an example of IPC-related best practices to other health care workers
  • educate and train staff and students on IPC practices
  • monitor compliance with IPC standards among health care workers
  • prepare and submit reports detailing IPC surveillance, compliance and strategies
  • maintain currency with IPC standards and guidelines developed by Alberta Health, Alberta Health Services or Health Canada, as applicable to their particular health care setting
  • conduct risk management assessments
  • perform research on matters related to infection prevention and control, disseminate the results, and make and implement recommendations based on the findings
  • coordinate outbreak management.

Infection control professionals work closely with Registered Nurses, Licensed Practical Nurses, Medical Laboratory Technologists, Sterile Processing Technicians, Physicians and other health care workers.

Working Conditions
Updated Dec 14, 2016

Hours of work may vary. Infection control professionals may work full-time, part-time or casual hours. They often work standard weekday hours, but may also work some weekend and holiday shifts. Some infection control professionals are required to be on-call during off hours. For those working outside of Edmonton or Calgary, travel is often required.

Infection control professionals must employ best practices and observe safety guidelines, precautions and standards related to the care of patients with infectious diseases in order to protect their patients, themselves, and other health care workers from the spread of infection.

  • Strength Required Strength requirements vary
Skills & Abilities
Updated Dec 14, 2016

Infection control professionals need the following characteristics:

  • interpersonal skills
  • the ability to work independently and as part of a team
  • communication and problem-solving skills
  • conflict resolution skills
  • organizational skills
  • the ability to multitask.

They should enjoy working with people. They should also like following guidelines and procedures and implementing standards and regulations.

Educational Requirements
Updated Dec 14, 2016

Most emerging occupations develop from more than one occupation so infection control professionals may come from a variety of education and training backgrounds. Prior to enrolling in an education program, prospective students should contact associations and employers in this field to investigate education options and employment possibilities.

Infection control professionals usually require a minimum of a bachelor's degree in nursing or another health-related science, as well as previous experience working in a health care setting.

Infection control professionals are generally required to obtain their Certification of Infection Control (CIC) from the Certification Board of Infection Control within a certain time period after being hired.

Infection control professionals are often required to be a licensed member of an applicable health professional regulatory body, such as the College and Association of Registered Nurses of Alberta (CARNA), the College of Medical Laboratory Technologists of Alberta (CMLTA), or the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Alberta (CPSA).


Related Education

The following schools offer programs or courses that are related to this occupation but are not required to enter the field.

Grant MacEwan University

Mount Royal University

University of Calgary

University of Lethbridge

For a broad list of programs and courses that may be related to this occupation try searching using keywords.

Employment & Advancement
Updated Dec 14, 2016

Emerging occupations typically are the result of:

  • an increased human need (for example, improved patient protection)
  • technological advances 
  • greater specialization within an occupation.

Often there are too few people working in an emerging occupation to gather survey information. Therefore, it can be difficult to define advancement opportunities or employment outlook. Some Albertans already are working in this emerging occupation but future demand for infection control professionals is unknown. 

Infection control professionals work in:

  • hospitals
  • health centres
  • clinics
  • group homes
  • other health care settings.

Infection control professionals are part of the larger 2011 National Occupational Classification 3124: Allied primary health practitioners.  In Alberta, 92% of people employed in this classification work in the Health Care and Social Assistance (PDF) industry.

The employment outlook in this occupation will be influenced by a wide variety of factors, including:

  • trends and events affecting overall employment (especially in the Health Care and Social Assistance industry)
  • location in Alberta
  • employment turnover (work opportunities generated by people leaving existing positions)
  • occupational growth (work opportunities resulting from the creation of new positions that never existed before)
  • size of the occupation.

Demand for infection control professionals is expected to continue growing in Alberta as the province's Infection Prevention and Control strategy is further developed and implemented.

Wage & Salary
Updated Dec 14, 2016

Salary levels vary by employer. Based on job postings from 2012 it was estimated that infection control professionals may be paid between $65,000 to $98,000 per year.

Often there are too few people working in an emerging occupation to gather survey information. Therefore, no salary data specific to infection control professionals is currently available.

Infection control professionals are part of the larger 2011 National Occupational Classification 3124: Allied primary health practitioners.

According to the 2015 Alberta Wage and Salary Survey, Albertans in the Allied primary health practitioners occupational group earned on average from $40.75 to $48.37 an hour. The overall average wage was $46.94 an hour. For more information, see the Allied primary health practitioners wage profile.

Related High School Subjects
  • English Language Arts
  • Mathematics
  • Science
    • Biology
    • Chemistry
  • Health, Recreation and Human Services
    • Community Care Services
    • Health Care Services
Related Post-Secondary Field of Study
  • Health Care and Medical Sciences
Other Sources of Information
Updated Dec 14, 2016

Alberta Health Services job profile web page: www.albertahealthservices.ca/careers/page362.asp

Certification Board of Infection Control website: www.cbic.org/

For more information on career planning, education and jobs, visit the Alberta Learning Information Service (ALIS) website, call the Alberta Career Information Hotline toll-free at 1-800-661-3753 or 780-422-4266 in Edmonton, or visit an Alberta Works Centre near you.

Updated Mar 25, 2013. The information contained in this profile is current as of the dates shown. Salary, employment outlook and educational program information may change without notice. It is advised that you confirm this information before making any career decisions.

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