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Occupational Profile

Electrologist

Electrologists use electrolysis to permanently remove unwanted hair.

  • Avg. Salary $27,773.00
  • Avg. Wage $16.88
  • Minimum Education Varies
  • Outlook Up
NOC & Interest Codes
The Electrologist is part of the following larger National Occupational Classification (NOC).
Electrologists
NOC code: 6482.3
METHODICAL

Interest in compiling information for clients' treatment files

SOCIAL

Interest in serving - assisting clients by removing unwanted hair permanently from client's face and body

OBJECTIVE

Interest in precision working when using needles of specialized electrical hair removal equipment, laser and other equipment

Reading Interest Codes
A Quick Guide

The interest code helps you figure out if you’d like to work in a particular occupation. It’s based on the Canadian Work Preference Inventory (CWPI), which measures 5 occupational interests: Directive, Innovative, Methodical, Objective and Social.

Each set of 3 interest codes is listed in order of importance.

A code in capital letters means it’s a strong fit for the occupation. 

A code in all lowercase letters means the fit is weaker.

Learn More

Duties
Updated Dec 15, 2016

Electrologists remove unwanted hair by introducing a fine sterilized filament into a hair follicle and transmitting a controlled pulse of energy through the filament. This cauterizes and destroys the hair production area. The loosened hair is then removed with forceps. Since this is an invasive procedure, electrologists must follow sterilization practices as outlined by Alberta Health Services.

Electrologists work with one client at a time. In general, they:

  • discuss needs and preferences with clients and find out if they have any physical conditions which would make electrolysis inadvisable
  • use a sanitizing agent to clean the skin and hair area that is to be treated
  • attach a sterilized filament inside a round-tipped probe to an electrolysis machine (epilator) and postition a large magnifying glass or microscope to view the area that is to be treated
  • insert the round-tipped probe into each follicle, activate a preset electrical current, withdraw the probe and remove the hair with forceps
  • clean the skin again after treatment.

Sessions may take from 15 minutes to several hours depending on the area to be treated and the client's tolerance for discomfort. The number of sessions required depends on the extent and nature of the unwanted hair.

When not working directly with clients, electrologists:

  • sterilize forceps
  • clean their equipment and work area
  • keep records of services provided.

They also may be responsible for booking appointments and accepting payments.

Working Conditions
Updated Dec 15, 2016

Electrologists work indoors in clean, quiet surroundings and usually wear uniforms or lab coats. They may work full time or part time. Saturday and evening work often is required.

  • Strength Required Lift up to 5 kg
Skills & Abilities
Updated Dec 15, 2016

Electrologists need the following characteristics:

  • good eyesight and steady hands and nerves
  • a safety conscious and caring attitude
  • the ability to put people at ease
  • a neat, well groomed appearance.

They should enjoy:

  • taking a methodical approach to compiling information
  • serving and assisting people
  • using specialized tools and equipment.
Educational Requirements
Updated Dec 15, 2016

Prospective electrologists should discuss their career plans with practicing electrologists before enrolling in a training program.

Requirements for the Certified Professional Electrologist (CPE) designation awarded by Electrolysis Society of Alberta (ESA) include a 500 hour training program at an accredited school and successful completion of an exam. To attain the required hours for designation, applicants usually have to take multiple training programs. Contact the ESA for a current list of accredited schools.

The Medi Aesthetics Institute of Canada in Red Deer offers an electrolysis course that can be completed in four to five months. It includes a combination of on-site training and practical experience. Graduates of this course will obtain the required 500 hours to apply for the CPE designation.

For a broad list of programs and courses that may be related to this occupation try searching using keywords.

Employment & Advancement
Updated Dec 15, 2016

Above-average occupational growth is expected in Alberta for 2016 to 2020. Job openings are a result of employment turnover and newly created positions.

Electrologists are employed, or work on a contract basis, in electrolysis studios, some beauty salons and laser hair removal clinics. Some electrologists own and operate their own studios. Most provide other esthetic services as well as electrolysis.

Advancement in this occupation generally takes the form of building a larger clientele.

Electrologists are part of the larger 2011 National Occupational Classification 6562: Estheticians, electrologists and related occupations. In Alberta, 79% of people employed in this classification work in the Other Services industry. However, most cosmeticians work in the Retail Trade (PDF) industry.

The employment outlook in this occupation will be influenced by a wide variety of factors including:

  • trends and eventsaffecting overall employment (especially in the industries listed above)
  • locationin Alberta
  • employment turnover (work opportunities generated by people leaving existing positions)
  • occupational growth(work opportunities resulting from the creation of new positions that never existed before)
  • size of the occupation.

Over 4,900 Albertans are employed in the Estheticians, electrologists and related occupations occupational group. This group is expected to have an above-average annual growth of 2.0% from 2016 to 2020. As a result, 98 new positions are forecast to be created each year, in addition to job openings created by employment turnover. Note: As electrologists form only a part of this larger occupational group, only some of these newly created positions will be for electrologists.

Employment turnover is expected to increase as members of the baby boom generation retire over the next few years.

Wage & Salary
Updated Dec 15, 2016

Electrologists' overall earnings vary considerably depending on location and the person's reputation. Daily earnings depend on the rates charged and number of treatments performed.

Electrologists may rent space in a beauty salon and keep their earnings separate from those of the salon, or they may be employed by the salon and be paid a basic salary plus commission. Those who operate their own shops must pay overhead costs (for example, rent, utilities) from their earnings. They may earn very little in their first year of operation.

Electrologists are part of the larger 2011 National Occupational Classification 6562: Estheticians, electrologists and related occupations. 

According to the 2015 Alberta Wage and Salary Survey, Albertans in the Estheticians, electrologists and related occupations occupational group earned on average from $13.55 to $21.03 an hour. The overall average wage was $16.88 an hour. For more information, see the Estheticians, electrologists and related occupations wage profile.

Related High School Subjects
  • Health, Recreation and Human Services
    • Esthetics
Related Post-Secondary Field of Study
  • Personal and Food Services
Other Sources of Information
Updated Dec 15, 2016

Electrolysis Society of Alberta website: www.onlineesa.com

For more information on career planning, education and jobs, visit the Alberta Learning Information Service (ALIS) website, call the Alberta Career Information Hotline toll-free at 1-800-661-3753 or 780-422-4266 in Edmonton, or visit an Alberta Works Centre near you.

Updated Apr 09, 2014. The information contained in this profile is current as of the dates shown. Salary, employment outlook and educational program information may change without notice. It is advised that you confirm this information before making any career decisions.

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