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Financial Analyst

Financial analysts collect, evaluate and apply financial, economic and statistical data to analyze and evaluate investment opportunities, or make financial decisions and recommendations.

  • Avg. Salary $95,286.00
  • Avg. Wage $47.54
  • Minimum Education 4 years post-secondary
  • Outlook below avg
  • Employed 5,400
  • In Demand Lower
Also Known As

Investment Analyst, Securities Analyst

Skills Shortage

Employers that Recruited in the Last 2 Years

54%
54%
Average Wage
Starting
Overall
Top
  • Certification Not Regulated
  • Strength Required Lift up to 5 kg
NOC & Interest Codes
The Financial Analyst is part of the following larger National Occupational Classification (NOC).
Financial Analysts
NOC code: 1112.1
METHODICAL

Interest in planning short- and long-term cash flows, assessing financial performance, and in implementing and using tools for managing and analyzing financial portfolios

INNOVATIVE

Interest in analyzing investment projects; in developing tools for managing and analyzing financial portfolios; and in evaluating financial risk and preparing financial forecasts, financing scenarios and other documents concerning capital management

directive

Interest in consulting with financial backers to follow up on financing projects

Reading Interest Codes
A Quick Guide

The interest code helps you figure out if you’d like to work in a particular occupation. 
It’s based on the Canadian Work Preference Inventory (CWPI), which measures 5 occupational interests: Directive, Innovative, Methodical, Objective and Social.

Each set of 3 interest codes is listed in order of importance.

A code in capital letters means it’s a strong fit for the occupation.

A code in all lowercase letters means the fit is weaker.

Learn More

Duties
Updated Mar 30, 2017

In general, financial analysts:

  • define possible risks and returns from investments
  • recommend investments to help clients reach their financial goals
  • evaluate the securities of companies (which includes estimating the future earning power of each company).

In securities firms, analysts:

  • study mainly public companies
  • prepare reports for stockbrokers, institutional investors and retail clients
  • market their recommendations to in-house salespeople and external clients
  • work with investment bankers to attract new corporate clients.

Most analysts specialize in specific industries or segments of the market.

In large institutions such as banks, pension funds and governments, financial analysts may:

  • monitor national and international stock and bond markets
  • monitor national and international economic conditions
  • follow major Canadian and international industries such as oil and gas, forestry, banking, mining and telecommunications
  • conduct in-depth studies of companies or investment opportunities that are relevant to their organizations' focus.

They usually specialize in stock, bond or real estate markets. They often prepare reports for fund managers. These reports suggest how best to invest funds ranging from millions of dollars to hundreds of millions of dollars.

Working Conditions
Updated Mar 30, 2017

Financial analysts work long hours in an office environment under constant pressure to meet deadlines. The work is intense and detail oriented. It often involves working with computers and custom-designed software. Some travel may be required.

  • Strength Required Lift up to 5 kg
Skills & Abilities
Updated Mar 30, 2017

Financial analysts need to possess:

  • high ethical standards
  • an analytical skills to conduct thorough, objective research and recommend wise investments
  • good time management skills
  • an ability to deal with frequent interruptions
  • good communication skills
  • an ability to present their findings effectively.

They should enjoy taking a methodical approach to collecting information, analyzing problems and finding creative solutions. They should also enjoy consulting with people and directing the work of others.

Educational Requirements
Updated Mar 30, 2017

Most employers require prospective analysts to have several years of relevant work experience and at least 1 university degree. They may prefer applicants who have completed a finance-related program and an industry-related program. For example, a degree in geology or petroleum engineering is an asset for analysts working in the oil and gas industry.

Most employers encourage or require junior analysts to complete the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) program offered through the CFA Institute


Related Education

The following schools offer programs or courses that are related to this occupation but are not required to enter the field.

Athabasca University

Northern Alberta Institute of Technology

Southern Alberta Institute of Technology

For a broad list of programs and courses that may be related to this occupation try searching using keywords.

Employment & Advancement
Updated Mar 30, 2017

Below-average occupational growth is expected in Alberta for 2016 to 2020. Job openings are a result of employment turnover and newly created positions.

Financial analysts are generally employed in the head offices of:

  • securities firms
  • investment banking firms
  • banks
  • trust companies
  • governments
  • insurance companies
  • mutual and pension funds
  • accounting firms
  • investment counselling firms
  • other large private corporations.

Foundations and schools with large amounts of money to invest also may employ financial analysts.

Most financial analysts who work for investment firms work in head offices that are often located in Central Canada. Many of the analysts employed in Alberta work in energy sector head offices in Calgary. Some experienced financial analysts are self-employed and act as private consultants.

Financial analysts are part of the larger 2011 National Occupational Classification 1112: Financial and investment analysts. In Alberta, 77% of people employed in this classification work in the following industries:

The employment outlook (PDF) in this occupation will be influenced by a wide variety of factors including:

  • trends and events affecting overall employment (especially in the industries listed above)
  • location in Alberta
  • employment turnover (work opportunities generated by people leaving existing positions)
  • occupational growth (work opportunities resulting from the creation of new positions)
  • size of the occupation.

Over 4,700 Albertans are employed in the Financial auditors and accountants occupational group. This group is expected to have a below-average annual growth of 1.3% from 2016 to 2020. As a result, 61 new positions are forecast to be created each year, in addition to job openings created by employment turnover. Note: As financial analysts form only a part of this larger occupational group, only some of these newly created positions will be for financial analysts.

Employment turnover is expected to increase as members of the baby boom generation retire over the next few years.

Wage & Salary
Updated Mar 30, 2017

Salaries for financial analysts vary greatly depending on the analyst's responsibilities and qualifications and the type of employer. Bonuses for senior analysts in securities firms can increase their incomes substantially.

Financial and investment analysts
NOC code: 1112

Survey Methodology

Survey Analysis

Overall Wage Details
Average Wage
Average Salary
Hours Per Week

Hourly Wage
For full-time and part-time employees
  • Low
  • High
  • Average
  • Median
Starting
Overall
Top
Wages* Low (5th percentile) High (95th percentile) Average Median
Starting $20.81 $71.83 $39.16 $38.30
Overall $25.05 $87.38 $47.54 $44.71
Top $31.25 $105.00 $59.07 $49.52

Swipe left and right to view all data. Scroll left and right to view all data.

* All wage estimates are hourly except where otherwise indicated. Wages and salaries do not include overtime hours, tips, benefits, profit shares, bonuses (unrelated to production) and other forms of compensation.

A: High Reliability
Data Reliability Code Definition

High Reliability, represents a CV of less than or equal to 6.00% and 30 survey observations and/or represents 50% or more of all estimated employment for the occupation.


Industry Information
Oil & Gas Extraction
ALBERTA, ALL INDUSTRIES
Public Administration
Health Care & Social Assistance
Finance, Insurance, Real Estate, Leasing

Skills Shortage

Employers that Recruited in the Last 2 Years

54%
54%

Recruiting Employers that Experienced Hiring Difficulties

8%
8%

Employers with Unfilled Vacancies of over 4 Months

N/A

2015 Vacancy Rate

N/A
Related High School Subjects
  • English Language Arts
  • Mathematics
  • Business, Administration, Finance and IT
    • Enterprise and Innovation
    • Financial Management
    • Information Processing
    • Management and Marketing
Related Post-Secondary Field of Study
  • Business, Management and Administrative Studies
  • Communications
  • Computer and Information Technology
  • Mathematics
Other Sources of Information
Updated Mar 30, 2017

CFA Institute website: www.cfainstitute.org

CFA Society Calgary website: www.cfasociety.org/calgary

CFA Society Edmonton website: www.cfasociety.org/edmonton

Canadian Securities Institute (CSI) website: www.csi.ca

For more information on career planning, education and jobs, visit the Alberta Learning Information Service (ALIS) website, call the Alberta Career Information Hotline toll-free at 1-800-661-3753 or 780-422-4266 in Edmonton, or visit an Alberta Works Centre near you.

Updated Mar 30, 2017. The information contained in this profile is current as of the dates shown. Salary, employment outlook and educational program information may change without notice. It is advised that you confirm this information before making any career decisions.

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