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Occupational Profile
Emerging Occupations

Business Continuity Planner

Business continuity planners prepare organizations to respond to significant business disruptions (for example, extended power outages, computer system failures, natural disasters).

This is an emerging occupation. It may have evolved from an existing occupation or emerged in response to consumer needs or technological advances.

  • Avg. Salary N/A
  • Avg. Wage N/A
  • Minimum Education 4 years post-secondary
  • Outlook N/A
  • Employed 12,300
  • In Demand Medium
Also Known As

Business Continuity Analyst

Skills Shortage

Employers that Recruited in the Last 2 Years

54%
54%
Average Wage
Starting
Overall
Top
  • Certification Not Regulated
  • Strength Required Lift up to 5 kg
NOC & Interest Codes
The Business Continuity Planner is part of the following larger National Occupational Classification (NOC).
Duties
Updated Dec 14, 2016

Business continuity planners assess risks to the ongoing operation of businesses and make plans to mitigate, transfer or accept those risks. For example, businesses that handle personal financial transactions online may be susceptible to computer hackers. Business continuity planners recommend ways to reduce company risks and provide step-by-step instructions that assist employees to recover operations back to normal as efficiently as possible should the risk become a reality.

Larger organizations may need business continuity plans for several types of risks, (for example, computer system failure, leaked client information, epidemic, natural disaster).

In general, business continuity planners:

  • assess an organization's risk of disruption from unplanned or planned events
  • co-ordinate input from leaders and business areas throughout the organization to identify critical business functions and processes and the impact disruption may have 
  • develop relationships with information technology and other departments who provide services to the business areas
  • recommend business recovery strategies and prioritize options
  • identify the organization's emergency response and ongoing operational plan for critical business areas (for example, reduced services or services provided at alternate locations)
  • review emergency plans (for example, ordering building evacuations, identifying emergency command centres)
  • create inventory lists of primary equipment, systems and resources 
  • identify potential vendors and key contacts for emergency repairs and supplies
  • design and facilitate emergency response and continuity training exercises 
  • evaluate and revise continuity plans based on exercise results and ongoing developments
  • develop presentations, awareness programs and training manuals.

In times of crisis, business continuity planners:

  • lead the implementation of business continuity plans
  • set up off-site command and recovery centres if necessary
  • co-ordinate recovery efforts
  • act as a liaison and co-ordinator with public authorities, emergency workers, external agencies and members of the media
  • utilize designated crisis communication protocols for effective flow of information.
Working Conditions
Updated Dec 14, 2016

Business continuity planners work in offices. When co-ordinating responses to business disruptions they may work a considerable amount of overtime including evenings and weekends in locations that are offsite or related to the disruption.

  • Strength Required Lift up to 5 kg
Skills & Abilities
Updated Dec 14, 2016

Business continuity planners need the following characteristics:

  • excellent interpersonal skills
  • organizational, problem solving and leadership skills
  • excellent oral and written communication skills
  • the ability to handle multiple tasks with competing priorities
  • effective decision making skills in times of crisis.

They should enjoy analyzing organizational methods and conducting research, taking charge of situations, and providing critical assessments and constructive advice. This includes presenting findings and recommendations to decision makers, and responding to criticism.

Educational Requirements
Updated Dec 14, 2016

Most emerging occupations develop from more than one occupation so business continuity planners may come from a variety of education and training backgrounds. Prior to enrolling in an education program, prospective students should contact associations and employers in this field to investigate education options and employment possibilities.

Employers generally prefer to hire applicants who have several years of related experience in addition to a bachelor's degree in business administration, finance or information technology and certification in business continuity planning. Project management skills are a definite asset.


Related Education

The following schools offer programs or courses that are related to this occupation but are not required to enter the field.

British Columbia Institute of Technology

Southern Alberta Institute of Technology

For a broad list of programs and courses that may be related to this occupation try searching using keywords.

DRI Canada offers four levels of certification for Business Continuity Professionals. Certification as an Associate Business Continuity Professional requires successful completion of an exam.The following three certifications require applications be reviewed by DRI's Certification Commission, two or more years of experience, references and experience in professional practice subject areas:

  • Certified Functional Continuity Professional
  • Certified Business Continuity Professional
  • Master Business Continuity Professional.
Employment & Advancement
Updated Dec 14, 2016

Emerging occupations typically are the result of:

  • an increased human need (for example, alternative sources of energy)
  • technological advances
  • greater specialization within an occupation.

Often there are too few people working in an emerging occupation to gather survey information. Therefore, it can be difficult to define advancement opportunities or employment outlook. Some Albertans already are working in this emerging occupation but future demand for business continuity planners is unknown. 

Business continuity planners may be self-employed or employed by:

  • municipal, provincial and federal governments
  • large organizations
  • management consulting firms.

Business continuity planners are part of the larger 2011 National Occupational Classification 1122: Professional Occupations in Business Services to Management. In Alberta, 75% of people employed in this classification work in the following industries:

The employment outlook in this occupation will be influenced by a wide variety of factors including:

  • trends and events affecting overall employment (especially in the industries listed above)
  • location in Alberta
  • employment turnover (work opportunities generated by people leaving existing positions)
  • occupational growth (work opportunities resulting from the creation of new positions that never existed before)
  • size of the occupation.
Wage & Salary
Updated Dec 14, 2016

Often there are too few people working in an emerging occupation to gather survey information. Therefore, no current salary data is available for this occupation.

Salary data is available for the larger National Occupational Classification 1122: Professional occupations in business management consulting as part of the 2015 Alberta Wage and Salary Survey.

Professional occupations in business management consulting
NOC code: 1122

Survey Methodology

Survey Analysis

Overall Wage Details
Average Wage
Average Salary
Hours Per Week

Hourly Wage
For full-time and part-time employees
  • Low
  • High
  • Average
  • Median
Starting
Overall
Top
Wages* Low (5th percentile) High (95th percentile) Average Median
Starting $29.33 $67.07 $47.08 $51.06
Overall $37.02 $72.60 $53.20 $55.77
Top $45.86 $89.42 $64.67 $68.00

Swipe left and right to view all data. Scroll left and right to view all data.

* All wage estimates are hourly except where otherwise indicated. Wages and salaries do not include overtime hours, tips, benefits, profit shares, bonuses (unrelated to production) and other forms of compensation.

B: Good Reliability
Data Reliability Code Definition

Good Reliability, represents a CV of between 6.01% and 15.00% and/or fewer than 30 survey observations and/or if survey observations represent less than 50% of all estimated employment for the occupation.


Industry Information
Oil & Gas Extraction
ALBERTA, ALL INDUSTRIES
Public Administration
Health Care & Social Assistance
Finance, Insurance, Real Estate, Leasing

Skills Shortage

Employers that Recruited in the Last 2 Years

54%
54%

Recruiting Employers that Experienced Hiring Difficulties

13%
13%

Employers with Unfilled Vacancies of over 4 Months

4%
4%

2015 Vacancy Rate

N/A
Related High School Subjects
  • English Language Arts
  • Mathematics
  • Science
  • Business, Administration, Finance and IT
    • Enterprise and Innovation
    • Financial Management
    • Information Processing
    • Management and Marketing
Related Post-Secondary Field of Study
  • Business, Management and Administrative Studies
  • Computer and Information Technology
Other Sources of Information
Updated Dec 14, 2016

Business Continuity Institute (BCI) Canada: www.bcicanada.org

DRI Canada website: www.dri.ca

For more information on career planning, education and jobs, visit the Alberta Learning Information Service (ALIS) website, call the Alberta Career Information Hotline toll-free at 1-800-661-3753 or 780-422-4266 in Edmonton, or visit an Alberta Works Centre near you.

Updated Feb 01, 2012. The information contained in this profile is current as of the dates shown. Salary, employment outlook and educational program information may change without notice. It is advised that you confirm this information before making any career decisions.

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