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Apprenticeship

Parts Technician

Parts technicians are responsible for warehousing activities such as shipping and receiving, and planning and managing the flow of goods into, within and from organizations.

  • Avg. Salary $42,565.00
  • Avg. Wage $21.10
  • Minimum Education Apprenticeship
  • Outlook above avg
  • Employed 15,400
  • In Demand Lower
Also Known As

Auto Parts Salesperson, Materials Technician, Parts Picker, Salesperson, Warehouse Worker

NOC Codes

In Canada, the federal government groups and organizes occupations based on a National Occupational Classification (NOC) system. This alis occupation may not reflect the entire NOC group it is part of. Data for the NOC group can apply across multiple occupations.

The NOC system is updated every 5 years to reflect changes in the labour market. Government forms and labour market data may group and refer to an occupation differently, depending on the system used. Here is how this occupation has been classified over time:

  • 2006 NOC: Shippers and Receivers (1471);  Storekeepers and Parts Clerks (1472) 
  • 2006 NOC-S: Shippers and Receivers (B571);  Storekeepers and Parts Clerks (B572) 
  • 2011 NOC: Shippers and receivers (1521);  Storekeepers and partspersons (1522) 
Skills Shortage

Employers that Recruited in the Last 2 Years

28%
28%
Average Wage
Starting
Overall
Top
  • Certification Provincially Regulated
  • Strength Required Lift up to 20 kg
Related Videos
Parts Technician (6:33)
Materials Technician (6:19)
Interest Codes
The Parts Technician is part of the following larger National Occupational Classification (NOC).
Shippers and Receivers
METHODICAL

Interest in compiling information to maintain internal manual or computerized record-keeping systems; and in coding goods

OBJECTIVE

Interest in operating computers to keep records; and in unpacking and routing goods to appropriate storage areas; may operate fork lifts, hand trucks and other equipment to load, unload, transport and store goods

directive

Interest in overseeing loading and unloading of goods from trucks and other conveyances

Reading Interest Codes
A Quick Guide

The interest code helps you figure out if you’d like to work in a particular occupation. 
It’s based on the Canadian Work Preference Inventory (CWPI), which measures 5 occupational interests: Directive, Innovative, Methodical, Objective and Social.

Each set of 3 interest codes is listed in order of importance.

A code in capital letters means it’s a strong fit for the occupation.

A code in all lowercase letters means the fit is weaker.

Learn More

Storekeepers and Parts Clerks
METHODICAL

Interest in copying information to prepare requisition orders for parts and supplies, and to maintain records of orders and amount, kind and location of parts and supplies on hand

OBJECTIVE

Interest in operating computerized inventory systems; and in keeping records using manual systems

SOCIAL

Interest in speaking with customers to sell spare and replacement parts for motor vehicles, machinery and equipment in retail settings and to advise retail customers and internal users on appropriateness of parts, supplies and materials requested

Reading Interest Codes
A Quick Guide

The interest code helps you figure out if you’d like to work in a particular occupation. 
It’s based on the Canadian Work Preference Inventory (CWPI), which measures 5 occupational interests: Directive, Innovative, Methodical, Objective and Social.

Each set of 3 interest codes is listed in order of importance.

A code in capital letters means it’s a strong fit for the occupation.

A code in all lowercase letters means the fit is weaker.

Learn More

Duties
Updated Dec 14, 2016

In Alberta, the parts technician trade has two branches:

  • Parts Technician - Parts Technician
  • Parts Technician - Materials Technician.

For simplicity, the two branches are referred to as parts technician and materials technician in this profile.

Parts technicians manage and dispense parts inventories, and may be responsible for stock handling, identifying and cataloguing parts and assemblies, ordering, receiving, inspecting, sorting, or pricing and selling parts. They may work with parts from the original manufacturer or other manufacturers of automotive, heavy duty, farm implement, industrial, recreational vehicle, plumbing, electrical or other types of equipment.

Duties and responsibilities vary depending on the size of the wholesale, retail or warehouse distribution business and the types of parts involved. Some businesses specialize in one line of equipment such as a particular line of automotive parts; others stock parts for several makes of machinery and hardware supplies.

In general, parts technicians:

  • sell supplies and parts
  • order parts and keep inventories
  • receive supplies and store them according to a pre-arranged system
  • organize and ship exchange parts and returns
  • keep price lists and catalogues updated
  • prepare statements
  • submit bills
  • keep records
  • receive payments.

Materials technicians may be employed in many different settings and work with a wide variety of materials. Their duties and responsibilities can vary considerably from one job to another. However, in general, materials technicians:

  • prepare, generate and pick orders
  • pack and ship orders
  • receive shipments and ensure they are complete and in good order
  • process orders, customer product returns and the return of products to suppliers
  • control and manage stocking and storage to prevent loss
  • arrange the transport of materials by rail, air or road
  • calculate transportation costs and prepare transportation documents
  • import and export materials
  • use electronic material identification tools to schedule items for delivery and coordinate the delivery of products to end users
  • maintain material identification records
  • coordinate activities with internal and external customers
  • participate in business operations and planning
  • operate computer systems
  • operate material handling equipment (for example, dollies, hand trucks, pallet jacks, forklifts, cranes, conveyers)
  • use storage systems to handle and store products (use equipment to move items and place them in appropriate storage areas or bins)
  • supervise warehouse personnel
  • purchase materials
  • control inventory and forecast inventory needs
  • plan and supervise safety programs
  • oversee the ISO 9000 certification process
  • practice Total Quality Management (TQM)
  • design and plan warehouses.
Working Conditions
Updated Dec 14, 2016

Parts technicians and materials technicians may work indoors or outdoors. Indoor environments include offices, warehouses and storerooms where large inventories are kept, often on rows of shelves or in bins. Working hours vary depending on the industry.

The work can be physically demanding. Materials technicians often are on their feet all day and lift items that weigh up to 18 kilograms.

  • Strength Required Lift up to 20 kg
Skills & Abilities
Updated Dec 14, 2016

Parts technicians need the following characteristics:

  • the ability to deal effectively and courteously with the public even in difficult situations
  • basic math skills
  • the ability to pay careful attention to details such as parts catalogues and electronic inventory systems.

They should enjoy variety and working with people.

Materials technicians need:

  • physical strength and stamina
  • manual dexterity
  • the ability to work independently
  • good math, communication and computer skills
  • the ability to get along well with customers and fellow workers.

They should enjoy taking a methodical approach to their work, operating handling equipment and keeping detailed records.

Educational Requirements
Updated Dec 14, 2016

To work in Alberta, a parts technician or materials technician must be ONE of the following:

  • a registered apprentice
  • a certified journeyperson
  • someone who holds a recognized related trade certificate  
  • work for an employer who is satisfied that the technician has the skills and knowledge expected of certified journeyperson
  • self-employed.

To register with Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training, apprentices must:

  • have an Alberta high school transcript with at least English Language Arts 10-2 and Math 10-3, or equivalent, or a pass mark in all 5 GED tests, or pass an entrance exam.
  • find a suitable employer who is willing to hire and train an apprentice. Most employers prefer to hire high school graduates. 

Some employers require parts technicians to have experience working with the types of product sold (for example, automotive or farm implement parts) so they can answer customer questions about product use.

The term of apprenticeship for parts technicians is 3 years (three 12 month periods) that include a minimum of

  • 1,500 hours of on-the-job training in each year
  • 6 weeks of technical training in the first and third years
  • 8 weeks of technical training in the second year.

The term of apprenticeship for materials technicians is 3 years (three 12 month periods) that include a minimum of

  • 1,500 hours of on-the-job training in each year
  • 6 weeks of technical training in each year.

There are exceptions if the applicant has a recognized journeyperson certificate in a related trade.

High school students can earn credits toward apprenticeship training and a high school diploma at the same time through the Registered Apprenticeship Program (RAP).

Parts technician apprentices may take the interprovincial exam in the final period of their apprenticeship training to earn a Red Seal (certification recognized in most parts of Canada).

Technical training is arranged by Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training and is currently offered at:

  • Grande Prairie Regional College 
  • Lakeland College in Vermilion
  • Lethbridge College
  • the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT) in Edmonton  
  • Red Deer College
  • the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology (SAIT) in Calgary.

Lakeland College also offers technical training by distance delivery.

For more information, visit the Technical Training Centre on the Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training website.


Related Education

The following schools offer programs or courses that are related to this occupation but are not required to enter the field.

For a broad list of programs and courses that may be related to this occupation try searching using keywords.

Certification Requirements
Updated Dec 14, 2016

Parts Technician

There are two branches of this trade in Alberta: (1) parts technician and (2) parts technician - materials technician. Parts technicians manage and dispense a wide variety of mechanical, plumbing, electrical or other parts. Materials technicians move and manage goods into, within and from warehouses. For more information, see the Trades and Occupations section of Alberta's Tradesecrets website.

Legislation

Under Alberta's Apprenticeship and Industry Training Act and Parts Technician Trade Regulation, you do not have to be certified if you are self-employed or work for an employer who is satisfied that you have the skills and knowledge expected of a journeyperson certified by Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training. To learn the trade, you must become a registered apprentice.

What You Need

The term of apprenticeship for both branches of this trade is three years (three 12 month periods) with 1,500 hours of on-the-job training in each year. Parts technicians attend six weeks of technical training in the first and third years, and eight weeks of technical training in the second year. Materials technicians attend six weeks of technical training in each year. Apprentices must find suitable employers who are willing to hire and train apprentices, and successfully complete technical training examinations.

Working in Alberta

Parts technicians trained in other provinces and territories can work in Alberta if they hold a certificate or license recognized by the Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training Board or have the skills and knowledge expected of a journeyperson certified in Alberta. For more information, see the Recognized Trade Certificates page of the Tradesecrets website.

Contact Details

Any of the Apprenticeship and Industry Training Client Service Offices located throughout Alberta. For a list of office locations and telephone numbers, click on "Contact Us" on the home page of the Tradesecrets website (tradesecrets.alberta.ca).

This is an Apprenticeship trade. For full details, see the related certification profile

Employment & Advancement
Updated Dec 14, 2016

Parts technicians are employed by wholesale and retail businesses, and warehouse distributors that deal with all types of parts.

Materials technicians are employed by organizations that produce, process or use products such as office supplies, tools and equipment, food goods, textile products, farm equipment or industrial supplies. Most work in urban centres where manufacturers, wholesalers and large retailers have their warehouses. Some are employed where large manufacturing facilities are concentrated in non-urban settings (for example, at wood products plants or petroleum production facilities).

With the appropriate training and related work experience, parts technicians and materials technicians may advance to supervisory positions or move into related fields such as purchasing, sales, inventory control or materials management. 

The employment outlook for parts technicians and materials technicians will be influenced by a wide variety of factors including:

  • trends and events affecting overall employment (especially in the industries listed below)
  • location in Alberta
  • employment turnover (work opportunities generated by people leaving existing positions)
  • occupational growth (work opportunities resulting from the creation of new positions that never existed before)
  • size of the occupation.

Parts technicians are part of the larger 2011 National Occupational Classification 1522: Storekeepers and partspersons. In Alberta, 76% of people employed in this classification work in the following industries:

Over 3,400 Albertans are employed in the Storekeepers and Parts Clerks occupational group which is expected to have an annual below average growth of 0.6% from 2013 to 2017 in Alberta. It is forecasted that about 20 new positions will be created each year in addition to job openings created by employment turnover. (Note: Since parts technicians form only a part of the larger occupational group on which this forecast is based, only a portion of the new positions created will be for parts technicians.)

Materials technicians are part of the larger 2011 National Occupational Classification 1521: Shippers and receivers. In Alberta, 77% of people employed in the Shippers and Receivers occupational group work in the following industries:

Over 14,400 Albertans are employed in the Shippers and receivers occupational group. This group is expected to have an above-average annual growth of 1.9% from 2016 to 2020. As a result, 274 new positions are forecast to be created each year, in addition to job openings created by employment turnover. Note: As parts technicians form only a part of this larger occupational group, only some of these newly created positions will be for parts technicians.

Over 3,000 Albertans are employed in the Storekeepers and parts clerks occupational group. This group is expected to have an above-average annual growth of 1.9% from 2016 to 2020. As a result, 57 new positions are forecast to be created each year, in addition to job openings created by employment turnover. Note: As parts technicians form only a part of this larger occupational group, only some of these newly created positions will be for parts technicians.

Employment turnover is expected to increase as members of the baby boom generation retire over the next few years.

Wage & Salary
Updated Dec 14, 2016

Journeyperson wage rates vary but generally range from $13 to $35 an hour plus benefits (2014 estimates), depending on industry sector and geographic location in the province. Apprentice parts technicians and materials technicians earn at least 65% of the journeyperson wage rate in their place of employment in the first year, 75% in the second and 85% in the third. 

Storekeepers and partspersons

Survey Methodology

Survey Analysis

Overall Wage Details
Average Wage
Average Salary
Hours Per Week

Hourly Wage
For full-time and part-time employees
  • Low
  • High
  • Average
  • Median
Starting
Overall
Top
Wages* Low (5th percentile) High (95th percentile) Average Median
Starting $12.20 $37.68 $20.67 $20.00
Overall $12.90 $39.25 $25.33 $25.00
Top $14.02 $46.15 $29.72 $28.85

Swipe left and right to view all data. Scroll left and right to view all data.

* All wage estimates are hourly except where otherwise indicated. Wages and salaries do not include overtime hours, tips, benefits, profit shares, bonuses (unrelated to production) and other forms of compensation.

A: High Reliability
Data Reliability Code Definition

High Reliability, represents a CV of less than or equal to 6.00% and 30 survey observations and/or represents 50% or more of all estimated employment for the occupation.


Industry Information
Manufacturing
Construction
Public Administration
Transportation and Warehousing
Wholesale Trade
ALL INDUSTRIES
Finance, Insurance, Real Estate, Leasing
Health Care & Social Assistance
Retail Trade
Other Services (Repair, Personal Services and Related)

Skills Shortage

Employers that Recruited in the Last 2 Years

45%
45%

Recruiting Employers that Experienced Hiring Difficulties

28%
28%

Employers with Unfilled Vacancies of over 4 Months

4%
4%

Vacancy Rate

1%
Shippers and receivers

Survey Methodology

Survey Analysis

Overall Wage Details
Average Wage
Average Salary
Hours Per Week

Hourly Wage
For full-time and part-time employees
  • Low
  • High
  • Average
  • Median
Starting
Overall
Top
Wages* Low (5th percentile) High (95th percentile) Average Median
Starting $13.00 $26.00 $17.54 $17.00
Overall $15.00 $29.50 $21.10 $19.93
Top $17.00 $38.65 $26.30 $25.00

Swipe left and right to view all data. Scroll left and right to view all data.

* All wage estimates are hourly except where otherwise indicated. Wages and salaries do not include overtime hours, tips, benefits, profit shares, bonuses (unrelated to production) and other forms of compensation.

A: High Reliability
Data Reliability Code Definition

High Reliability, represents a CV of less than or equal to 6.00% and 30 survey observations and/or represents 50% or more of all estimated employment for the occupation.


Industry Information
Oil & Gas Extraction
Public Administration
Construction
Transportation and Warehousing
Professional, Scientific & Technical Services
Manufacturing
Wholesale Trade
ALL INDUSTRIES
Business, Building and Other Support Services
Other Services (Repair, Personal Services and Related)
Retail Trade
Finance, Insurance, Real Estate, Leasing

Skills Shortage

Employers that Recruited in the Last 2 Years

36%
36%

Recruiting Employers that Experienced Hiring Difficulties

15%
15%

Employers with Unfilled Vacancies of over 4 Months

2%
2%

Vacancy Rate

1%
Related Post-Secondary Field of Study
  • Trades, Industrial and Related Training
Other Sources of Information
Updated Dec 14, 2016

Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training website: tradesecrets.alberta.ca

Motor Dealers' Association of Alberta website: www.mdaalberta.com

For more information on career planning, education and jobs call the Alberta Supports Contact Centre toll-free at 1-877-644-9992 or 780-644-9992 in Edmonton, or visit an Alberta Supports Centre near you.

Updated Mar 29, 2015. The information contained in this profile is current as of the dates shown. Salary, employment outlook and educational program information may change without notice. It is advised that you confirm this information before making any career decisions.

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